Well Mitigation Program
As set out in Chapter 49B-3.005 of the Florida Administrative Code, the Tampa Bay Water Well Mitigation Policy reads as follows:

Tampa Bay Water shall mitigate on a priority basis all eligible water level and related complaints regarding domestic wells for existing legal users, as well as other eligible domestic wells constructed with a minimum of 147 feet (210 feet in the case of the South-Central Hillsborough Regional Wellfield) of 4 or 5-inch galvanized steel or PVC casing, except in those instances of well failure due to an Act of God (i.e., lightning strikes, power failure, and flooding). Mitigation under this policy shall be without a determination of the cause of the well failure. This procedure shall not limit the authority of the Southwest Florida Water Management District to require additional mitigation by rule or applicable water use permit condition. To be eligible for mitigation, a domestic well must be located within the mitigation area established for each wellfield in the current water use permit. In those cases where the current water use permit does not prescribe a mitigation area, the boundary of the mitigation area shall be the five (5) foot drawdown contour in the Floridan Aquifer caused by permitted peak month withdrawals from the wellfield, or a circle(s) whose radius extends two (2) miles from each active production well, whichever is greater; provided, however, that for facilities permitted for 3.5 mgd or less on an annual average basis the mitigation area shall be the five (5) foot drawdown contour in the Floridan Aquifer caused by permitted peak month withdrawals from said facility, or a circle whose radius is 1,760 feet from each active production well, whichever is greater.
Yes. This Policy only applies to domestic drinking water wells located within specific geographic areas. In addition, the well must either be an existing legal use or it must meet specified well construction criteria.

Finally, the problem with the well must be a water-level related issue as determined by Tampa Bay Water or a professional consultant retained by Tampa Bay Water.
No. This Policy only applies to domestic drinking water wells that are in current use. It does not apply to wells used for other purposes, such as agricultural, irrigation or commercial wells. It does not apply to wells that are part of drinking water systems (i.e. wells that supply multiple housing units). The Policy also does not apply to wells that have previously been abandoned.
Yes. The well must be located near Tampa Bay Water’s wellfields within the mitigation areas specified in Tampa Bay Water’s water use permits. Because these mitigation areas vary by wellfield, a determination of whether a well is within a mitigation area will be made by Tampa Bay Water when a complaint is received.
Yes. Unless the well is classified as an “existing legal use,” the well must be constructed with a minimum of 147 feet (210 feet in the case of the South-Central Hillsborough Regional Wellfield) of 4 or 5-inch galvanized steel or PVC casing.
The use of your well must pre-date the use of the nearest Tampa Bay Water wellfield. Because these dates vary by wellfield, this determination will be made by Tampa Bay Water when a complaint is received. Information about the age and construction materials of your well will need to be provided to Tampa Bay Water so we can make this determination.
You can review the paperwork that was provided to you, or a previous owner of your property, by the company that installed your well. If that paperwork is not available, you can check whether your well is listed on the Southwest Florida Water Management District well construction permit database here. You can also contact a Florida licensed well driller and have them examine your well and provide you with this information.
No. The Well Mitigation Policy only covers water-level related issues not water quality issues.

For information about testing the water quality of your well water, contact your local health department. Links to the county health department programs in the local area are set out below:

Hernando County

Hillsborough County

Pasco County

Pinellas County

Polk County
Not necessarily. There are several causes of sediment in well water. In older wells, sediment in your well water can be an indication that the well is filling with sand, perhaps because of damaged or degraded well components, such as casing, screens and seals. Sediment in well water can also be an indication of an improperly constructed well, a pump that is too large for the well, or the pumping rate for the well. These would not be considered water-level related issues.

During the course of our investigation, Tampa Bay Water will determine whether the problem with your well is eligible for mitigation under our program.
No. It’s important that Tampa Bay Water is involved in assessing the well and appropriate mitigation. If it is determined that a well qualifies for mitigation, Tampa Bay Water will hire a qualified well mitigation contractor to complete the needed work. Tampa Bay Water does not reimburse costs unless it has made its own determination that the well has a water-level related issue that qualifies for mitigation.
Please call (813) 929-4533 and leave a message. Your call will be returned within 24 hours.
You can find additional information about installing and maintaining domestic water wells here.